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CREATING A HOME MEDITATION SPACE FOR WHO YOU ARE

Jan 21, 2020

CREATING A HOME MEDITATION SPACE FOR WHO YOU ARE

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Written By: Mala Collective Founder & CEO, Ashley Wray

I like to think our home is an extension of who we are. Our values, our mindset, our dreams and our goals are reflected there. When you look around your home, does it feel inspirational? Does it make you want to step into the best version of yourself, and reach for new potential?

I believe our home reflects our mind, body and spirit. Our homes are a physical manifestation of how we want to feel, and a reflection of our values. When Mala Collective started in 2011, this was a manifestation of how I wanted to feel. While we ultimately began creating mala beads, I have always held space for curiosity about what it means to create a sense of calm, love, and grounding in my home space.

This curiosity has grown, and Mala Collective has evolved into different ways we can support people’s meditation practice in their most beloved spaces. I asked myself often, what would it look like to be reminded of my intention and to reflect on my meditation practice throughout the day, rather than simply sit for a few minutes in unintentional silence each morning (or a few mornings a week) and then move on with the day? How do I turn meditation into a living practice, one that I feel inspired by throughout the day?

Below, I’ve outlined a few ways I personally hold space for myself to reflect, to connect and most importantly, to breathe. I want to encourage you to consider the ways in which you may feel inspired, too. 

We all know the saying, ‘out of sight, out of mind.’ Visual reminders can be a powerful motivator for us to sit in meditation.

And if we have something that’s in visual line of our eyesight on a daily basis, we will want it to be beautiful, and reflect who we are. This space can be whatever you want it to be — a meditation room, an altar, etc. Just start small and grow and add to the space as you grow in your own personal journey.

Here are a few tips to creating a home space that inspires you to slow down, reconnect, and breathe.

Intention

Before you start putting together your area, get clear on your intention. This will help you decide what to bring into your space. Is it clarity? Maybe keep the area really clear and clean. Is it grounding or strength? Maybe use some darker, more grounding colors.

Crystals

This is a gorgeous first step in bringing your intention to life in physical form. Not only do crystals help us clear a space, but they also help remind us of an intention. Personally, I like to place quartz crystal in my meditation space to help clear the area of any negative energy. Then, I will add in different crystals depending on what I am calling into that practice. For example, rose quartz is for love. While moonstone inspires our connection ton intuition. Lava helps us tap into our strength, while labradorite reminds us of the serendipity and synchronicity of the universe. I find that laying out crystals infront of me in my practice is a powerful reminder of my intentions, as well as a beautiful way to set the stage for my meditation.

Meditation cushions

Placing a cushion in a space helps to create the foundational space. For me, it represents the centre of my meditation space. From here, I lay out crystals, light incense, use my singing bowl, etc. But this cushions marks my center. I’ve heard from many people that having a meditation cushion in a visible spot in their home has helped remind them to meditate each morning.

Meditation cushions are also functional in a practice. A round, taller cushion helps to support and elevate your hips. It’s important in a meditation practice to keep your spine straight allowing your breath to fill your body in every corner. Elevating our hips helps us to do this. While a larger square floor cushion below the round cushion will provide padding for your knees and ankles — this helps prevent them from falling asleep in meditation. One less distraction during your practice!  (This can also be a thick blanket or rug.)

Mala Beads

Malas aren’t just beautiful pieces of jewelry you can wear — they are also tools for your practice. Like crystals, the different malas carry different intentions. This often comes down to the stones and crystals you have in your mala. 

Personally, I like to have one or two malas that I meditate on that don’t leave my house or meditation space. My mala helps me to count my breaths and affirmations as I’m sitting in practice. It helps when my mind starts to wander — bringing me back to something tangible in my fingers. Because there’s 108 beads, it also helps me to know when I’m done a full meditation as working your way around a mala signifies a full practice. 

Sound

Having a crystal bown or tibetan bowl is a beautiful addition to a home meditation space. Using one of these in your practice is a powerful inclusion. 

Tibetan Singing bowls have been used in meditation and healing for centuries. Handmade by artisans in Nepal, our singing bowls are hand-hammered. This is the most traditional technique to make the bowls. The sounds from the singing bowls are thought to ease the brain into the same brain wave frequencies that induce deep meditation, clarity and intuition. The sound vibrations are believed to impact our nervous system, allowing relaxation and stress release. 

I like to use the bowl and the beginning and end of my practice to help signify the opening and closing of my meditation.

Scent

Adding the ritual of scent to a meditation space is one of my favorite things to do. For example, lighting incense at the beginning of practice or a candle helps activate the space. 

I also like adding aromatherapy by choosing a blend that aligns with the intention of the practice I am setting up. If it’s for calming, I will choose a most calming blend. If my meditation is for energy, I will choose a blend that reflects and supports that goal.

Plants

Personally, I always like to have something nearby that’s alive and providing oxygen. To bring something living into your meditation space is a simple yet thoughtful addition.

Journal

And finally, a journal. I always have my journal nearby so that I can reflect on my practice after meditating. It’s a great way to bring closure to your sit. Oftentimes, when I journal, I will include my daily mantra and any images, reflections, or feelings/sensations that arose during my practice.

A home meditation space is personal — only you will know what is truly supportive and reflective of your personality, desires, and intentions. Start small, and grow the space as you grow your practice. I hope this helps you take a moment for yourself in your busy mornings and evenings.

If you have any questions, comments or feedback on creating your home meditation space for who you are, or anything else mindfulness, meditaiton or self-love related you can visit me at www.malacollective.com or reach me via email at questions@malacollective.com. Namaste xoxo.

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